Project overview

We’re committed to the delivery of new kerbside protected bike lanes as part of our planning and vision for a sustainable and resilient city. See the new bike lane routes on the map below.

In delivering this project, we will continue to evaluate and monitor where improvements can be made along each route. We’re keen to understand your experience of the new lanes and gather feedback on what is working well and what can be improved further.

Delivering 40km of new bike lanes

Works began in 2020 and are being delivered in two stages.

Round one bike lanes include:

  • Abbotsford Street
  • Albert Street
  • Canning Street
  • Exhibition Street (stage 1)
  • Peel Street
  • Rathdowne Street
  • Swanston Street
  • William Street
  • footpath extensions on Spencer Street.

Round 2 bike lanes include:

  • Bourke Street
  • Exhibition Street (stage 2)
  • Flinders Street
  • La Trobe Street
  • Nicholson/Spring Street
  • Queens Bridge Street
  • Royal Parade
  • Spring Street
  • St Kilda Road
  • Whiteman Street.

Map of new bike lanes

Select the image to enlarge.

Map of new bike lanes

Feedback we've heard

Learn more about feedback we've heard and how we're responding to it by selecting the drop down of the routes below. Last updated December 2020.

For more detailed information about each route, visit new bike lanes.

Completed routes

Select the drop down to see the location of each route and the feedback we've received.

Flemington Road to Queensberry Street


What we heard: Reductions in parking spaces will impact residents.

How we've responded: Parking occupancy surveys that we undertook indicate that the planned reduction in parking spaces will not cause unreasonable pressure on remaining spaces. However, in response to feedback we will be reinstating parking spaces on Abbotsford Street if/when the Victorian Government approves the removal of the existing tram stop at Erskine St/Chapman St. We will continue to monitor parking occupancy and make any further changes to parking controls as required.


What we heard: Safety hazards and issues were identified, including:

  • parking too close to intersections
  • bollards obstructing delivery vehicles
  • damaged keep left signs
  • now-redundant line marking creating confusion.

How we've responded: We've reviewed each identified safety hazard and took steps to mitigate these quickly. Actions included relocating line marking, repairing damaged signs, and removing redundant line marking. Additional changes will be implemented as required following further community feedback and evaluation.


What we heard: The consultation process used for this project was inadequate.

How we've responded: We undertook extensive consultation and received significant feedback as part of the City of Melbourne Transport Strategy 2030, which includes the upgrade in Abbotsford Street. This project was strongly supported by the community. We are now progressing an accelerated bike lane program during the COVID-19 pandemic to provide an alternative option to public transport. Protected bike lanes are urgently required to avoid increased traffic congestion and provide a safe transport alternative with low transmission risk. Rapid roll-out bike infrastructure is being installed in cities around Australia and throughout the world. The Victorian Government is also fast tracking delivery of 100kms of new and upgraded bike lanes in Melbourne, many of which connect with our projects. We have notified residents, property owners and businesses along each route of our plan, invited feedback about the project and made further refinements where possible to designs. In the case of Abbotsford Street, we also undertook an additional consultation process to determine if local residents supported the removal of an existing tram stop to allow more parking to be installed and whether parking signage changes should be implemented. We’re committed to reviewing feedback post-installation to evaluate the success of projects. All new bike lane infrastructure is being installed with adjustable materials that will easily allow modification in the future if necessary. We welcome and encourage ongoing feedback.


What we heard: Pedestrians, including those accessing parked cars, will be put at risk.

How we've responded: We’ve assessed the pedestrian safety of kerbside protected bike lanes. Our research shows that when delivered correctly, kerbside bike lanes do not impact pedestrian safety. Additional pedestrian safety benefits are achieved through a shorter crossing distance as pedestrians can now stage their crossing of the roadway. For example, on Abbotsford Street, a 0.8m painted buffer is typically provided between the parking bays and the bike lane. This safety buffer zone is protected with physical islands at each end of the parking bays. This protected area serves to both reduce the incidence of car dooring of bike riders, as well as provide a space for people to safely enter and exit parked vehicles.


What we heard: The project will impact waste collection arrangements.

How we've responded: We’ve considered the needs of waste collection operators in the design of this new bike infrastructure. Our Project Team continues to work with City of Melbourne’s Waste Collection team to ensure that waste collection will not be interrupted or impacted due to the bike lanes. In the event of obstruction, the bike lane separator kerbs and islands are adjustable and we can modify the designs if necessary.


What we heard: Protected bike lanes should be provided on Queensberry Street to enhance the cycling network.

How we've responded: Unfortunately kerbside protected bike lanes cannot be installed on Queensberry Street currently as two traffic lanes in each direction have been installed (east of Peel Street) due to the fact that Grattan Street is closed for Metro Tunnel construction works. Queensberry Street is identified in the City of Melbourne Transport Strategy 2030 as a future protected bike lane. City of Melbourne is working with the State Government to determine the preferred long-term cross-section of Queensberry Street following completion of major Metro Tunnel construction works in the CBD.


What we heard: Local residents will be adversely impacted by the proposed tram stop removal at Erskine Street/Chapman Street.

How we've responded: The decision to remove a tram stop from Abbotsford St is supported by the City of Melbourne, but is still awaiting approval from the Department of Transport. This proposal aligns with the City of Melbourne Transport Strategy 2030, as it enables the effective delivery of kerbside protected bike lanes, while rationalising tram stops helps to prioritise public transport travel times. There are existing tram stops on Abbotsford Street in close proximity, including Abbotsford St interchange (90 to 150 metres away) and Molesworth Street & Abbotsford Street stop (140 to 160 metres away). The consultation process with local residents resulted in 81% of respondents supporting the proposed tram stop removal in order to minimise the overall net loss of parking spaces associated with the bike lane upgrade. As such, the City of Melbourne considers that there is general support from the local community for the removal of this tram stop.


What we heard: The ability for Abbotsford Street to move general vehicle traffic will be compromised.

How we've responded: There will be only minor reductions to traffic capacity at intersections along Abbottsford Street. The reallocation of kerbside space previously allocated to general vehicle traffic aligns with City of Melbourne's Transport Strategy 2030. It is not anticipated that these capacity reductions will significantly compromise vehicle flows along Abbotsford Street, which is a local road and not intended to be used by significant volumes of “through” motorists.


What we heard: Street trees may be impacted by this project.

How we've responded: This project does not include any plans to remove or alter existing street trees in Abbotsford Street.


What we heard: Access to laneways providing ROW access will be impacted.

How we've responded: The design aims to support vehicle movements accessing laneways along Abbotsford Street. We will make minor modifications to the design if access issues are identified.

Final 40 metres on the approach to the intersection with Nicholson Street.


What we heard: Review hazards on Albert Street such as the existing yellow rumble bars in cycle lane and the concrete islands at the new protected intersection at Lansdowne Street

How we've responded: We’ve put in place a number of measures to manage the speed of bike riders as they travel downhill in an eastbound direction along Albert Street. The existing rumble bars in the bike lane form part of these measures. The protected intersection at Lansdowne Street was designed and installed by the Victorian Government and has undergone an extensive design process. The intention of the physical islands within the intersection is to ensure left turning motorists turning across the bike lane are better “squared-up” prior to the bike lane conflict point. This helps to improve sight lines between left turning motorists and bike riders. The Victorian Government and City of Melbourne are continuing to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this intersection. This feedback has been considered as part of this ongoing evaluation.


What we heard: Improve protection for riders at intersections by providing improved traffic signals; Improve protection for riders at Hoddle Street intersection.

How we've responded: We’ve now provided protected bike lanes on the approaches to all intersections along Albert Street, with the exception of the intersection at Hoddle Street, which is managed by the Department of Transport (DoT).

We’re working with DoT on an ongoing basis to establish a solution for the Albert Street approach to Hoddle Street which successfully provides bike riders with necessary protection from turning vehicles.

Signals at other intersections along Albert Street, between Lansdowne and Hoddle Streets, have previously been coordinated to accommodate the speed of bike riders during peak periods in order to reduce delays and improve safety for people riding. This forms the City of Melbourne's first ever "Green Wave" corridor, helping to improve bicycle priority, and increasing safety by managing bike rider speeds.

We’ve also previously installed bike lanterns at several intersections to provide head-starts for people riding bikes, ahead of motorists. We will investigate ensuring this is provided at all intersections along Albert Street.

What we heard: Make streets safer for cycling by restricting residential through movements and reducing rat-running traffic.

How we've responded: The Transport Strategy 2030 identifies a number of strategies to support a reduction in vehicle through-traffic, including rat running. This includes restricting traffic through residential streets however this is delivered as part of larger streetscape projects with extensive community consultation.

Canning Street and Elgin Street (within 40 m of the intersection)


What we heard: Review design to reduce incidence of drivers entering bike lane by mistake.

How we've responded: We’ve reviewed the line marking at the Canning Street approach to Elgin in both northbound and southbound directions and have made additional changes, including adding chevron markings and moving green painted areas. These new line marking arrangements will help reduce the number of drivers who enter the bike lanes by mistake, as well as reduce confusion and safety hazards for riders approaching the intersection. The design in the southbound direction includes a physical island to reduce the width of the bike lane and discourage motorists from entering. Unfortunately, this style of design was not possible in the northbound direction because there is a laneway located very close to the intersection of Elgin Street. We will continue to monitor and continue to make minor modifications to discourage left turning motorists entering the bike lanes. It is important to note that when the street configuration is changed, it often takes a period of time for user behaviour to adjust.


What we heard: Reductions in vehicle capacity will impact local residents who drive.

How we've responded: Minor reductions to traffic capacity have occurred at the intersection approaches. The reallocation of kerbside space previously allocated to general vehicle traffic to protected bike lanes aligns with City of Melbourne's Transport Strategy 2030. It is not anticipated that these capacity reductions will significantly compromise vehicle flows along either Elgin or Canning Streets, particularly along Canning Street where traffic volumes are low due to the many existing road closures provided along this street. Traffic modelling was undertaken and predicted that modest traffic queues will result from this project. Making this street less attractive as a rat run has significant local amenity benefits by creating safer, quieter and slower streets for the local community to enjoy.


What we heard: Bike riders tend to ignore red bike signal, and confusion exists amongst road users regarding who is required to give way.

How we've responded: We’ve collected feedback about this, which will be used to inform the development of a proposed behaviour change program.

Flinders Street to Bourke Street


What we heard: These lanes are helping make a previously dangerous and chaotic lane much safer for people to travel along.

How we've responded: During the development of City of Melbourne’s Transport Strategy 2030, significant community input identified Exhibition Street as a high priority for the installation of physically protected space for people to ride. This project seeks to improve safety, legibility and comfort for those who will choose to ride on this key north-south route.


What we heard: Removal of short term parking and loading zones on Exhibition Street will impact delivery operations in the city.

How we've responded: The delivery of protected kerbside bike lanes along Exhibition Street has made allowances for a number of short term parking and loading zone spaces to be maintained. In this regard, it is primarily 1P-2P-metered spaces that are being removed along Exhibition Street.

City of Melbourne has worked with relevant businesses and property owners to ensure specific drop-off and pick-up requirements are accommodated. The project team will continue to evaluate the effectiveness of these new parking arrangements and make adjustments where necessary.

Despite this, the City if Melbourne has an ongoing policy of reducing on-street parking places across the city. Since 2010, 22% of on-street car parking spaces have been removed to support more efficient transport within the council area. The reductions to the number of car parking spaces provided on Exhibition Street aligns with this policy and the objectives of the Transport Strategy 2030.

What we heard: People ride bikes on the footpath causing a hazard to pedestrians.

How we've responded: The delivery of protected kerbside bike lanes supports riders of all ages, abilities and confidence levels to travel in a safe, dedicated space. This helps to reduce the incidence of people riding on footpaths within the City of Melbourne. Our on-street compliance team continues to monitor issues such as footpath riding and can refer specific issues to Victoria Police. Following installation of the new bike lanes, please feel free to report any specific locations and times of the day when you continue to observe a significant volume of bike riders still riding along a section of footpath.


What we heard: Concerns regarding removal of trees between Flinders Lane and Flinders Street.

How we've responded: As part of this project, we’ve removed centre-of-road parking between Flinders Lane and Flinders Street, along with two existing mature centre-median street trees. This area will be reinstated with seven new centre-median street trees, and a continuous centre median to provide improved growing conditions. The replacement of these two trees with seven new trees is supported by both the Urban Forest Strategy and the Transport Strategy 2030.


What we heard: Parked cars in bike lane create a major safety hazard, in particular between Flinders Lane and Flinders Street.

How we've responded: This project involves providing a fully protected kerbside bike lane, eliminating the need for bike riders to make dangerous manoeuvres to avoid parked vehicles. The design should also discourage motorists from parking in the new bike lane, as they previously did when only peak period bike lanes were provided via signage and line marking provisions. Should you notice cars illegally parked in the new kerbside protected bike lane, please report this to City of Melbourne via our customer service team.


What we heard: The reduction in traffic lanes have resulted in additional traffic congestion along Exhibition Street.

How we've responded: We anticipate some increase in travel times for drivers using Exhibition Street as part of this project due to a reduction in traffic lanes along most blocks. This is supported by the Transport Strategy 2030. City of Melbourne have worked with the Department of Transport and Transurban to ensure traffic flows are maintained at key locations including Flinders Street. As part of this project, Exhibition Street and many other routes will be made safer and more reliable for people choosing to travel by bicycle. This will encourage new people to start riding bikes, who may have previously driven motor vehicles to/from the city centre. This will result in a reduction in road congestion both on Exhibition Street and across the central city.

Harbour Esplanade to Spencer Street

No feedback received for these routes before December 2020. This will be updated in our next round of feedback responses.

Victoria Street to Faraday Street

No feedback received for these routes before December 2020. This will be updated in our next round of feedback responses.

East side of Spencer Street, between Lonsdale and Collins streets. Short section of footpath extension on the north side of Collins Street, just east of Spencer Street.


As part of this program, we’re installing footpath extensions on the east side of Spencer Street, between Lonsdale and Collins streets in December 2020. There will also be a short section of footpath extension on the north side of Collins Street just east of Spencer Street.

The existing footpaths will be extended into the roadway using bollards, temporary kerbs, planter boxes, bicycle hoops and seating to create a safe space for pedestrians.

The extensions are the first step in delivering much needed space on our busy footpaths – we know footpaths and pedestrian crossing waiting areas on Spencer Street and are the most overcrowded in the city at peak commute times.

These changes will help support physical distancing and provide more space to get the city moving again as COVID-19 restrictions are eased.

Around the University of Melbourne from Grattan Street to Princes Park Drive.


What we heard: New kerb separators need to be more visible to drivers, line marking adjustments should be made to reduce risk of collisions between trams, drivers, and parked cars.

How we've responded: We will continue to review all bike lane projects to ensure that the line marking and signage enables road users to be aware of the new separator islands and kerbs. Where necessary, people making submissions have been contacted directly to ensure new arrangements have delivered the desired safety improvements.


What we heard: New bike lanes are helping people travel confidently by bike in this area. Additional connections are needed to Keppel Street, and further protection kerbs and speed reductions will make the street safer.

How we've responded: We appreciate your support for our bike lane projects. We also already have plans to install a new access ramp to assist bike riders connect from Swanston Street to Keppel Street. This ramp will particularly assist people riding bikes to connect between Keppel Street and our new off-road shared path along College Crescent which provides connections to Princes Park Drive and Royal Parade. The City of Melbourne is proposing to install reduced 40km/h speed limits on local roads in all suburbs of the municipality. The 40km/h speed limits are proposed to be installed in Carlton in 2022/23, subject to approval from the Victorian Government. To maximise safety for all road users on Swanston Street, we are seeking Victorian Government approval for an accelerated delivery of 40km/h speed limits along Swanston Street.


What we heard: Due to changes to parking, there is now an undersupply of drop off/pick up spaces near the childcare, and the bike lane can be unsafe for children.

How we've responded: Parking allocation along Swanston Street has been modified since the original design to better cater for drop-off/pick-up movements near the childcare centre. There are now ’10 minute limit’ pick-up and drop-off parking spaces provided on both sides of Swanston Street – outside the childcare centre. So, motorists arriving in either direction can easily obtain short-term parking opportunities.

Additional line marking has also been installed to provide an enlarged buffer zone to support safe pedestrian access to vehicles using these spaces.


What we heard: Consideration has not been given to the impact on traffic flow, and other local access needs. Signals should be updated to provide a red signal for bike riders to improve traffic throughput at Elgin Street.

How we've responded: A reduction in traffic capacity through the intersection of Swanston Street and Elgin Street is necessary to enable the delivery of safe and protected lanes for bike riders. These trade-offs are supported by City of Melbourne's Transport Strategy 2030 which guides the way we use our streets and roads. Advance bicycle lanterns will be provided as part of future upgrades to the traffic signals at this intersection. The lead time for signals changes is approximately 18-24 months. Given the urgency to deliver the project this has been identified as a separate supplementary project.


What we heard: The new bike lanes on Swanston Street are compromised by a lack of connection to Princes Park Drive.

How we've responded: A new widened footpath – with a section allowing cycling movements in both directions - is currently being constructed along the south side of College Crescent. It is anticipated that this project will be complete in early 2021.


What we heard: Consider advanced bike signal for southbound cycle lane.

How we've responded: Advance bicycle lanterns will be provided as part of future upgrades to the traffic signals at this intersection. These are not considered critical to the function of the intersection and due to the need to deliver these lanes as part of our accelerated program, it was decided signals did not need to form part of the initial installation of protected infrastructure here.


What we heard: There is currently no clear infrastructure to support movements of bike riders turning from Swanston Street, to travel eastbound along Elgin Street.

How we've responded: Our team will investigate additional options to support turning movements, including the provision of bicycle-only hook turn line marking.

Dudley Street to La Trobe Street


What we heard: The new kerbside protected bike lane in the southbound carriageway is too narrow opposite Flagstaff Gardens, and represents a safety hazard.

How we've responded: We’ve designed the William Street kerbside protected bike lanes this way intentionally in the areas immediately adjacent to two hotels opposite Flagstaff Gardens. This has enabled the painted buffer zone between the bike lane and the parking bays to be widened from the standard 0.8 metres to a more generous width of 1.5 metres to enable sufficient space for hotel guests to load and unload luggage, which may be bulky and unable to safely fit within the standard 0.8 metre wide buffer zones.

This design also ensures that bike riders moderate their speed and travel in single file for the short distances adjacent to these hotel pick-up and drop-off conflict points. This design approach acknowledges that these hotels have significantly higher volumes of car passengers crossing the bike lanes, including passengers who may be less aware of the new bike lanes and carrying bulky luggage.

We’ve received feedback regarding the trial use of physical islands as part of this narrowing. As such, we will cut-back the width of these physical islands by 200mm. This will effectively enable the safe passage of cargo bikes and cycles adapted for disability needs through this space. The effectiveness of both the bike lanes and buffer zones will continue to be monitored by our transport engineers.

What we heard: Gaps in the protected cycling network along Peel Street and at several locations along William Street compromise the ability for this route to be successful.

How we've responded: The City of Melbourne is currently designing accelerated kerbside protected bike lanes along Peel Street between Dudley Street and Haymarket Roundabout, allowing delivery of a protected North-South corridor connecting to Royal Parade as outlined in the Transport Strategy 2030. However, this bike lane will still include some ‘gaps’ on the approaches to signalised intersections which will need to be improved in the future in collaboration with the Victorian Government who own and manage this arterial road. Additional review of the William Street lanes will include identifying remaining gaps in protection in order to provide future improvements which provide a fully connected bike route.


What we heard: Visitors arriving at hotels and other businesses along William Street require kerbside access to safely enter and exit vehicles.

How we've responded: The new kerbside protected bike lanes along William Street have been designed to accommodate drop-off and pick-up movements by including a widened painted buffer zone between parking spaces and the new kerbside bike lane. These buffer zones are at least 1.5 metres wide, in comparison to the standard buffer zone widths of 0.8 – 1.0 metres provided adjacent to most parking spaces. This enables ample space for hotel guests to load and unload luggage, which may be bulky and unable to safely fit within the standard 0.8 metre wide buffer zones.

This design also results in a narrowed bike lane being provided for a short distance at these conflict points to ensures that bike riders moderate their speed and travel in single file for the short distances adjacent to these hotel pick-up and drop-off points.

City of Melbourne will continue to monitor this trial arrangement and modify designs as required. Prioritising safety of bike riders and delivering a connected and fully separated bicycle network is key to the City of Melbourne Transport Strategy 2030.


What we heard: Ability to travel safely via a protected North-South corridor will be hugely beneficial to new riders.

How we've responded: City of Melbourne continues to seek to connect our network of high-quality bicycle infrastructure, as per the Transport Strategy 2030.


What we heard: Better wayfinding is required to support connections between William Street and La Trobe Street corridors.

How we've responded: Our team is currently investigating opportunities to use wayfinding signs and pavement logos to complement new kerbside protected bike lanes across the City. Connections between these two routes will be included in upcoming wayfinding plans.


Little Collins to Queens Bridge


What we heard: Line marking and signage is insufficient to clearly indicate to drivers where driving lanes and car parking is.

How we've responded: The City of Melbourne will continue to review all bike lane projects to ensure that the line marking and signage is adequate to ensure all road users are aware of the new separator islands and kerbs.

We are also happy to make specific reviews when concerns about specific locations are received.

We have already installed additional line marking and signage to help clearly demarcate vehicle lanes, and parking bays. Please continue to feed back any errant parking or driving to our team for follow up with either further line marking review, or parking enforcement where appropriate.

What we heard: Motorcycle riders may not see bike riders using protected lanes due to blind spots created by motorcycle helmets, and the limited ability to head check while riding a motorcycle.

How we've responded: The new kerbside protected bike lanes delivered along William Street are consistent with other street layouts throughout the City of Melbourne, and have been evaluated from a safety perspective. Research indicates that protected bike lanes enhance road safety throughout the city for all road users. All road users have a responsibility to check for other road users when travelling on public roads, just as motorcyclists would need to check for people travelling by bicycle regardless of whether kerbside protected bike lanes are provided or not.


What we heard: Gaps in the protected cycling network at Queensbridge and through Southbank compromise the ability for this route to be successful.

How we've responded: The City of Melbourne is currently accelerating the design of bike lanes along Queens Bridge Street and Whiteman Street. These links are identified as critical elements of our protected bike lane network in the City of Melbourne Transport Strategy 2030. This will enable the delivery of a protected and continuous bike corridor to connect existing popular bike routes through South Melbourne and Port Melbourne to/from the new William Street bike lanes in the CBD.


What we heard: Bike lane is too narrow in both directions between Flinders Street and Flinders Lane, and represents a safety hazard.

How we've responded: The northbound William Street kerbside protected bike lane has been intentionally narrowed to 1.3m immediately adjacent to a hotel to enable a wider painted buffer zone to be provided between the bike lane and the pick-up and drop-off parking bay adjacent to the hotel.

This aims to provide sufficient space for hotel guests to safely load and unload luggage, particularly given advice from hotel management indicated that there are often bus loads of hotel guests and their luggage which need to be unloaded.

This is a trial arrangement, and changes to bike lane and traffic lane widths may be considered following an evaluation of the infrastructure.

The southbound lane on the opposite side narrows to 1.2m on the approach to the intersection of Flinders Street. This is the widest possible bike lane width that can be delivered at present as the median currently widens towards the Flinders Street end of the street.

In the future, permanent works to provide a narrower median will be investigated, allowing for kerbside protected bike lane widths that align with City of Melbourne's Bike Lane Design Guidelines to be provided all the way to the Flinders Street intersection.

What we heard: Traffic management during construction is resulting in dangerous merging at Queens Bridge St.

How we've responded: We’ve continually reviewed the traffic management in place during construction of these lanes and have addressed safety considerations raised by a member of public through improved signage.

Upcoming routes and works underway

Select the drop down to see the location of each route.

Spring Street to Russell Street

Flinders Street to La Trobe Street

Bourke Street to Victoria Street

Siddeley Street to Elizabeth Street

Victoria Street to Haymarket Roundabout

City Road to Flinders Street

Park Street to Grattan Street (southbound only)

Lonsdale to Victoria Street

Southbank Boulevard to Coventry Street (southbound) Toorak Road to High Street

Queensbridge Street to the intersection of Clarendon Street and Normanby Road

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